Becoming obsessed with my hobby

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These days I find myself thinking about sewing, constantly. I would be sitting watching TV or riding down the ride and I am designing or modifying a pattern to update a look. I have recently discovered African Print Fashion. The two photos above are what I am working on now.

I have found several sites where I can get fabric. I have several patterns that I can modify for the dresses, blouses, coats, jackets, etc. I am truly obsessed with this. I still make American Girl clothes, on occasion, or if I granddaughter or niece ask me. Recently, I purchased a mini sewing machine for my truck, so when I stop to take my break, I can sew for 2 hours before going to bed. I use it mainly for the doll clothes but I have used it to make a blouse.

I am in process of trying to set up my room for my sewing, which is looking pretty cluttered right now. I realize the room is not as big as I imagined it, so adding another table won’t work. I just recently purchased another dress form, smaller one for those who are not plus sized. I may need a larger one as well.

My latest projects.

Cold Shoulder

Big trucks can be seen traveling through small towns as well as the big cities. For the most part, they are welcomed, at least until that one driver does something to ruin it for all.

Now, the small to medium towns or cities say, “We welcome big rigs as long as they drop off our goods. You cannot stay past your delivery time and you cannot park in our shopping centers, Walmarts, or Lowes. If you are hungry, you should bring it with you because there is ‘no parking’ for you.” The area may not have a food delivery service like GrubHub or DoorDash, that can deliver food to your truck.

Your time is limited to your delivery or pick up and then you have to leave. The nearest truckstop may be 20, 30, or 40 miles away. You may not have the time to travel to them, anyway.

So, what do you do, because getting the Cold Shoulder ain’t cool.

FMCSA grants CRST exemption request for student drivers By Mark Schremmer, Land Line associate editor | Friday, October 19, 2018

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration announced on Friday, Oct. 19 that it renewed an exemption for CRST Expedited that allows the Cedar Rapids, Iowa-based trucking company to have student drivers run team with a commercial driver’s license holder.

Current regulations require a CDL holder with the proper class and endorsements to be seated in the front while a commercial learner’s permit holder is driving on public roads or highways. The exemption allows student drivers who passed the skills test but have not yet received the CDL document to drive a CRST commercial motor vehicle accompanied by a CDL holder “who is not necessarily in the passenger seat.”

CRST’s previous exemption from the regulation was granted for two years on Sept. 23, 2016. The new exemption is effective for five years until Sept. 24, 2023.

“FMCSA has analyzed the exemption application and the public comments and has determined that the exemption, subject to the terms and conditions imposed, will achieve a level of safety that is equivalent to, or greater than, the level that would be achieved absent such exemption,” the agency wrote.

CRST says the exemption allows the company to “foster a more productive and efficient training environment by allowing commercial learner’s permit holders to hone their recently acquired driving skills through on-the-job training and to begin earning an income right away. “

Through the end of 2017, CRST reported zero crashes to FMCSA involving drivers using the exemption.

FMCSA has granted similar exemptions to such fleets as C.R. England and New Prime.

The Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association has spoken outagainst such exemptions.

During the public comment period for CRST’s request, Jarrod Hough, an OOIDA member from Indianapolis, questioned the logic.

“Why would FMCSA even consider this? The roads and traffic are bad enough already,” Hough wrote. “Permit holders don’t have the experience to operate a commercial vehicle by themselves without the trainer sitting upfront and in the passenger seat. That is what a trainer is for, to teach and give guidance to the student. Not to be in the sleeper berth while the student is left alone.”