FMCSA wants to track what truckers do in their personal vehicles

Steve Wilcox
about 19 hours ago

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has filed a request to investigate what CDL truck and bus drivers do during their home time. Specifically, the agency aims to study the effects of “excessive commuting” between a drivers home and work terminal.

If the request for the study is approved by the White House’s Office of Management and Budget (OMB), then the FMCSA plans to survey up to 12,000 drivers to perform their research.

In the proposal, the FMCSA states that long commute times [between a commercial driver’s home and work terminal] “can lead to excessive fatigue while on duty, creating safety concerns for both the CMV driver and other drivers on the roads.”

Although no new rules or regulations are being proposed, the study could become the foundation for future regulations.

In order to complete the study, the FMCSA will ask 12,000 registered CDL holders to complete a 20-minute online survey. The FMCSA will pay drivers a $10 incentive to complete the survey.

The agency is currently accepting public comments on the proposed study.

As of January 6th, the proposal has received 18 public comments. A majority of the comments oppose the proposed study.

Driver Tammy Dodge wrote the following public comment:

This is not required to subject truck drivers to this. This is a violation of their privacy it seems to me. First this ELD thing which these electronic devices have been unreliable at the very least and follow no common sense approach to everyday circumstances that are dealt with daily by the drivers. These regulations seem to be unfairly aimed at the truck driver to make their jobs almost impossible to work. This is just another bad regulation aimed at the truck driver that might live a ways away from their terminal. Now the FMCSA wants to penalize them even more for having to drive to work. Will it ever stop? It just keeps going on and on with bad regulations aimed at the everyday, hard working, family supporting, tax paying truck driver. Not to mention without these hardworking individuals this country would not be able to enjoy all the essentials needed for basic daily life. The government and the FMCSA needs to stop targeting this group that keeps America running, and stop continually listening to the giant fleet owners and every group that has to blame someone for something that happens on the road. ENOUGH IS ENOUGH FMCSA!!!

Another driver, Brandon Kisamore, stated the following:

FMCSA needs to find something better to do than make our lives harder. I’ve had my fill of your nonsense and if it continues, this industry will be one more driver short.

In order to post your own public comment, click here, or search for Docket ID: FMCSA-2017-0313 on the website. The public comment period will close on January 26th, 2018.

FMCSA proposes plan to establish driver screening

| June 28, 2013

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration has proposed a nine-year plan for identifying the riskiest drivers and addressing unsafe driver behavior.

The current transportation appropriations act requires FMCSA to report to Congress on the Driver Fitness component of the Compliance, Safety, Accountability program.

The agency’s report this month included possible steps to implement a driver Safety Fitness Determination. It would require completing other priorities and having dedicated resources, officials wrote.

During the first year, FMCSA would conduct a driver SFD feasibility study, including a severity weighting system for violations.

The next year, it would develop driver safety measurement methodology,  processes for identifying the riskiest drivers and possible interventions. Also that year, it would estimate the number of drivers who would be rated unfit and the potential safety benefits of the change.

During years three through five, FMCSA would test and refine the new Driver SFD methodology and related processes.

FMCSA would complete a notice-and-comment rulemaking to establish the Driver SFD methodology, enforcement and due process in the sixth year. It also would issue a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking.

Agency officials would evaluate NPRM comments before issuing a Final Rule and final regulatory impact analyses during the seventh year. The FR compliance date would likely be no more than two years after publication of the rule.

In the eighth year, FMCSA would train governmental officials regarding the Driver SFD program and provide educational materials to the public. During the ninth year, the agency would fully implement the program.